Benefits of Strength Training For Women
by Gemma Carter

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The majority of women at gyms steer clear of the weights room and don't attempt any weights machines or free weights giving endless reasons why they don't try them. There is a belief amongst women that strength training has no benefit for women and only ends up ‘bulking you up’. 

Here I explain the many reasons why you may want to reconsider and start pumping that iron!

Increases strength

Doing weights regularly will increase your overall strength. This will make everyday activities seem a lot easier and can also help improve your stamina in other sports.

Helps lose fat

Each pound of muscle you gain through weight training can burn up to another 50 calories a day. By weight training just a few times a week you can build nearly 2 pounds of it over 2 months and don't worry, you'll be losing at least 3 pounds of fat at the same time so you'll be leaner and more toned.

No bulk

This is one of the major reasons women avoid weights - they fear it will turn them into the incredible hulk! However, research has shown that women generally do not gain bulk from strength training as they do not have the same bulk-building amounts of testosterone (Roughly 10 to 30 percent less). You will however become leaner and more toned.

Strengthens your bones

Research has shown that weight training improves your bone mineral density by as much as 13 percent in just 6 months. This is very important as women are more prone to osteoporosis in old age.

Can boost performance

Pumping those weights can improve your overall performance and additionally reduce the likelihood of injury. This is because it strengthens your core and the ligaments and tendons that surround joints which are zones prone to injuries.

Helps your heart

Weight training can keep your heart healthy by increasing your HDL (good) cholesterol and lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol and blood pressure

Lowers your risk of type 2 diabetes

Regular weight training has been shown to improve glucose utilisation by up to 23 percent in just 4 months, reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes.

You can do it at any age

It doesn't matter how old you are, strength training improvements can happen at any age- even 80 years old.

Boost your confidence

Weight training has been shown to improve women's self confidence and reduce the symptoms of clinical depression. You'll feel like a real pro in the gym!

Prevents boredom!

Weight training has unlimited choices and variations which can liven up an old routine. By adding different machines and floor weights to your workout every week you'll feel much more excited about your workout and motivated to train more.
  
Increases lean muscle mass

You won't get bulky or big by doing weights - if you do them correctly. Women have lower levels of testosterone in their body so it’s a lot harder to 'bulk up' than men.

Increased metabolic rate

One of the most important benefits of strength training is that it can increase your metabolic rate even hours after training.

Injury prevention

Strength training strengthens muscles, tendons ligaments and bones thus lowering the chance of injury. This is especially important as women grow older and the risk of osteoporosis rises.

Improved balance

Strength training helps resolve muscle imbalances and poor posture as well as improving balance as the core is strengthened. This gives you greater coordination.

Aids rehabilitation and recovery

After injury, a strength program is a vital component to speed up recovery. Such injuries as knee damage rely on strong quads, calves and strength in the tendons and ligaments supporting it.

It fights depression

A Harvard study found that 10 weeks of strength training reduced clinical depression symptoms more successfully than standard counselling did.

Article by:
Gemma Carter who is a fully trained fitness and life coach.
Visit her website at http://www.cartercoaching.co.uk or email her at: gemma@cartercoaching.co.uk
 


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